Thursday 28 March 2013

Fully Catholic, fully open


Fully Catholic and fully open: our seminarians need this. No need to get mad at the mere mention of Gita or Kundalini.

The option of the Church has ever been both/and, not either/or. When faced with the Arian challenge, the Church decided: the Father is God, the Son is God, and there is one God. It was Arius who was the true rationalist, the true Hellenizer. Failing to understand the mystery, he opted to chop off one wing. If Father and Son are both God, there will be two Gods. So the Son cannot be God. The Church: we do not understand; but scripture says; and so: Father is God, Son is God, and there is one God. Later, faced with the mystery of Christ, again the temptation to say: either human or divine. And the Church: both fully human, and fully divine. A mystery that we still struggle with, as when we speak so glibly of the foreknowledge of Christ, and fall quite unwittingly into a Catholic monophysitism.

Aquinas is the great example of the Catholic position. No demonizing of Aristotle, but a patient work of bold discernment: adopt, and adapt. Here Aristotle is put under tribute to the gospel; the gospel remains the supreme criterion. With all his love for Augustine, Aquinas chose to depart from Plato in favour of Aristotle when the need arose. Evangelical boldness. Parrhesia. Not black and white.

Despoiling the Egyptians, as Newman might put it. Reversing the counterpositions, as Lonergan might say, not rejecting the counterpositions. Counterpositions are not mere errors, but truths set in an erroneous or faulty context.

A great attitude to have when faced with the religions, with New Age, even with the non-religions.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Featured post

Rupnik, “E se l’evangelizzazione chiedesse una novità nella vita consacrata?” English summary

“EVANGELIZATION – DOES IT CALL FOR SOMETHING NEW FROM CONSECRATED LIFE?” MARKO RUPNIK, SJ “E se l’evangelizzazione chiedesse una novit...