Monday 13 May 2013

Mirto and mirtillo

Gianni pointed out to me mirto plants in the shrubbery outside the Jerusalem Municipal Offices. Mirto is myrtle in English, and is used to make the mirto liqueur of Sardinia. It is not the same as mirtillo, which translates as blueberry in English. The gardens of Jerusalem tend to be abundant on herbs: lavender (lavanda), myrtle, rosemary (rosemarino), mint (menta), and so on. The monks and nuns of Deir Rafat make a wonderful ointment called lavandula, most effective for bodyaches and muscle pulls.

The nespolo instead is translated as loquat. Very common in Italy, but also around here: we have several trees in our garden. 

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