Friday 13 September 2013

Vidal's 'The Golden Age' again

I'm coming to the end of Gore Vidal's The Golden Age, and I must say I am getting addicted to Vidal's novels. He has this droll sense of humour, and is absolutely sharp in his observations of human behaviour, though he can get boring at times. I enjoyed Lincoln tremendously, and this one, focussing on Franklin Roosevelt, his successor Harry Truman - the one who dropped the bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki - and their eventful times, with the Second World War morphing into the Long Cold War. Strangely the novel ends with Peter Sanford as an old man in the time of the Clinton presidency. And Peter seems to be an alter ego of Gore Vidal, who himself makes an appearance in the novel. Though perhaps Aeneas Duncan, Peter's partner in The American Idea, is also part Vidal - the novel makes him the author of a manuscript called The Golden Age.
"FDR is like Lincoln, masterly and unknowable, his ‘vast depths of benign insincerity could never be entirely plumbed by any mere mortal’." Zachary Leader, "No Accident," at http://www.lrb.co.uk/v23/n12/zachary-leader/no-accident as of 14 Sep 2013.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Featured post

Rupnik, “E se l’evangelizzazione chiedesse una novità nella vita consacrata?” English summary

“EVANGELIZATION – DOES IT CALL FOR SOMETHING NEW FROM CONSECRATED LIFE?” MARKO RUPNIK, SJ “E se l’evangelizzazione chiedesse una novit...