Friday 18 April 2014

"With loud cries and tears"

"During his life Jesus offered entreaties to God with loud cries and tears."
Jesus weeping over Jerusalem: Dominus flevit.
"See how he loved him," the Jews say upon seeing Jesus weeping for his friend Lazarus.
"He went out and wept bitterly," we read about Peter in the gospel of Luke, after his triple negation of his friend, and after the look of Jesus.
"Do not weep for me, but weep instead for yourselves and your children," Jesus says to the women of Jerusalem.

Jesus weeping - for his friend Lazarus, and in the Garden - for whom?

Peter weeping - for whom? For himself? For his friend whom he had betrayed?

And Jesus telling the women - and all of us - to weep for ourselves, not for him. Is that the key? To his suffering, his agony, his cry of abandonment (Eloi Eloi...)?

These are not tears of self-pity. These are not the tears of impending loss, or not only that ("the intuition of loss"). The focus - is elsewhere. On the Other.

The communique of the bishops of the Holy Land is impressive, in this regard (see "Persecution of Christians in the Middle East: Communiqué of the Assembly of Catholic Ordinaries in the Holy Land," at http://en.lpj.org/2014/04/03/persecution-of-christians-in-the-middle-east-communique-of-the-assembly-of-catholic-ordinaries-in-the-holy-land/.  

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